Health Employment And Labor labor and employment law for the healthcare industry

Category Archives: Multi-Employer Plans

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Impact: Employers Brace for Change – Top 5 Issues Facing Businesses, as appeared in Insurance Advocate

Allen Roberts, a Member of Firm in the Labor and Employment practice and co-chair of the firm’s Whistleblowing and Compliance Subpractice Group, in the New York office, wrote an article titled “Impact: Employers Brace for Change – Top 5 Issues Facing Businesses, as appeared in Insurance Advocate.”

Following is an excerpt:

By popular account, the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”) would preserve the base of insureds and extend health insurance coverage to as many as another 32 million Americans. That estimate could be wrong if ACA disrupts patterns and experience of spouse and dependent coverage on employer-paid policies.

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Hurricane Sandy: Tax and Employee Benefits Relief Available to Employers

In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, employers with employees and operations impacted by Hurricane Sandy are asking what types of tax and employee benefits relief may be available to them and their affected employees.  The Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”), the Department of Labor (“DOL”) and the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (“PBGC”) have moved quickly to provide disaster relief guidance for affected employers and their employees.

IRS Relief.  In response to Hurricane Sandy, on November 2, 2012, the IRS in IR-2012-84 declared Hurricane Sandy a “qualified disaster” for federal income tax purposes under Section 139 of the Internal Revenue Code of … Continue Reading

Obama Reelected: The Department of Labor Wants to Know If You Are Taking Steps to Comply With Healthcare Reform

By Amy J. Traub, Gretchen Harders, Anna Kolontyrsky, and Margaret C. Thering

With the reelection of President Obama, it is clear that employers should be preparing to comply with all of the applicable provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (the “Affordable Care Act”).  As employers well know, the Affordable Care Act contains comprehensive healthcare reform provisions, including, among other things, the mandate that larger employers face penalties starting in 2014 if they do not make affordable healthcare coverage available to their workers, the so-called … Continue Reading

Poorly Crafted Wellness Programs Could Make Employers Sick

Kara Maciel, Member of the Epstein Becker Green Labor and Employment, Litigation, and Health Care and Life Sciences  Practices, was recently interviewed by Employment Law360 concerning employer wellness programs. 

According to the article, businesses are turning to wellness programs to curb health care expenses, but programs that aren’t carefully crafted can open employers up to costly privacy and discrimination litigation, attorneys say.  Wellness programs can lead to big savings for employers by targeting behaviors that can cause  conditions that drive up their health care expenditures. But programs that give employers too much  information about their employees can leave employers vulnerable … Continue Reading

U.S. Department of Labor Cracks Down on MEWAs

On December 6, 2011, the U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) issued a proposed rule on Form M-1 filing requirements, a proposed rule on DOL ex parte cease and desist orders, a notice of proposed form revision to Form M-1 and a notice of proposed form revision to Form 5500  implementing new requirements for multiple employer welfare arrangements (“MEWAs”) under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“PPACA”) (referred to as the “Proposed Rules”).  PPACA prohibits false statements or representations of fact about a MEWA’s financial condition, benefits provided and its regulatory status in connection with the marketing of … Continue Reading

Health Care M&A: Unwary Asset Purchasers May Take On Unwanted Employment-Related Liabilities.

Acquirers of businesses often prefer to buy the assets of a seller, rather than the stock, to avoid assuming the seller’s liabilities.  Indeed,  the general common law rule is that a purchaser of assets does not assume the seller’s liabilities absent an agreement to do so, fraud or other inequitable conduct between the parties, whereas in a stock sale, the buyer steps into the shoes of the seller and assumes all assets and liabilities of the seller.  In an asset sale, the seller, in turn, would typically use part or all of the sale proceeds to pay its liabilities.  During … Continue Reading

Union Posting Rule Postponed Three Months

On August 30, 2011, the National Labor Relations Board (the “Board”) issued a highly controversial and very pro-labor rule requiring employers to post notices informing employees of their right to join or form a union.  The rule was originally supposed to go into effect in November, but was subsequently pushed back to January 31, 2012 as a result of mounting criticism against the rule.  Indeed, several lawsuits have been filed by business groups alleging that the Board overstepped its discretion in imposing the rule on employers.  A federal judge in one of the cases recently asked the Board to further … Continue Reading