How will the Trump administration handle discrimination cases involving transgender employees? The EEOC’s pursuit of a sex discrimination claim on behalf of Aimee Stephens, a transgender woman who was terminated by a Michigan funeral home for expressing her intention to dress in conformance with her gender identity, will be an early indicator.

In a brief filed with the Sixth Circuit on January 26, 2017, Stephens argues that the interests of transgender individuals will not be adequately represented under the new administration. Under the Obama administration, the EEOC sued Stephens’ former employer, R.G. & G.R. Harris Funeral Homes, for sex discrimination on her behalf. The funeral home owner argued permitting Stephens to dress as a woman would conflict with his Christian beliefs and pose a threat to his free exercise of religion. The Eastern District of Michigan dismissed the EEOC’s lawsuit in August 2016 on the grounds that the funeral home is exempt from Title VII under the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (“RFRA”). Although the EEOC appealed to the Sixth Circuit in October 2016, Stephens filed a motion to intervene as plaintiff-appellant, citing her belief that the new administration would not adequately represent her interests.

Over the course of Obama’s presidency, the trend in federal government was the extension of protections for transgender individuals. Many federal agencies, including the EEOC, OFCCP, OSHA, and HHS, previously promulgated rules and guidance affording increased protections for transgender individuals. Numerous federal courts, including the First, Sixth, Ninth, and Eleventh circuits, have applied theories of sex stereotyping under Section 1983 or Title VII, resulting in protections for transgender individuals. Few courts, however, have found gender identity or transgender status is a protected class under Title VII. Indeed, the district court in G.R. & R.G. Funeral Homes rejected that position when presented by the EEOC.

Whether the EEOC will continue to aggressively pursue the expansion of Title VII to include transgender protections remains an open question. While still just a rumor, it has been reported that the Trump administration is considering an executive order that would provide individuals and organizations the ability to deny employment, as well as services and other benefits, to LGBT individuals on religious grounds. In her motion, Stephens references the removal of the White House webpage dedicated to LGBT rights, the federal government’s requests for extensions of time in other civil rights cases, and the President’s authority over EEOC appointments as reasons she believes her interests may not be adequately represented. Further, the current acting chair of the EEOC, Victoria Lipnic, was one of two commissioners who voted against the EEOC’s July 2015 decision that held that sexual orientation is included within the definition of sex for discrimination purposes under Title VII. The Trump administration also has rescinded guidance previously issued by the departments of Education and Justice under the Obama administration that took the position that the Title IX prohibitions of discrimination “on the basis of sex” require access to sex-segregated facilities based on gender identity.

On the other hand, the EEOC filed its opening brief with the Sixth Circuit just two weeks after Stephens moved to intervene, arguing that (a) discrimination based on transgender status and/or transitioning is inherently sex discrimination under Title VII; and (b) the RFRA does not provide the for-profit funeral home a defense in this case. This stance is consistent with that taken by the EEOC while Obama was in office. Further, Trump has indicated Executive Order 13672, which banned federal contractors from discriminating against LGBT employees, will stand.

Stephens’ case may have implications for the protection of transgender employees at the federal level, but employers need to keep in mind that many states explicitly prohibit discrimination against transgender workers. At least sixteen jurisdictions – including California, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey and the District of Columbia – now include gender identity as a protected characteristic under their discrimination laws.

Employers are advised to familiarize themselves with their state and local laws, to take a proactive role in preventing transgender, or gender identity, discrimination in the workplace, and to have a plan in place to accommodate the potential needs of transgender workers.

Nathaniel M. Glasser
Nathaniel M. Glasser

On July 18, 2016, the final rule implementing Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”) went into effect.   Section 1557 prohibits health care providers and other covered entities from refusing to treat individuals or otherwise discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability in any health program or activity that receives federal financial assistance or is administered by an executive agency.

While the rule does not apply to employment, it derives many of its standards from existing federal civil rights laws and the federal government’s current interpretations of those laws.  Covered entities (which include, for example, hospitals, health clinics, health insurance programs, community health practices, physician’s practices, and home health care agencies) should be particularly aware of the protections granted to individuals with these protected characteristics:

  • Sex – Under the rule, prohibited sex discrimination includes differential treatment based upon pregnancy, false pregnancy, termination of pregnancy, or recovery therefrom, childbirth or related medical conditions, sex stereotyping and gender identity. Covered entities should be particularly aware that they must treat individuals consistent with their gender identity; they cannot deny or limit sex-specific health care just because the individual seeking such services identifies as belonging to another gender; and they cannot categorically exclude coverage for health care services related to gender transition.
  • National Origin – Covered entities must take “reasonable steps” – which may include providing language assistance services such as oral language assistance or written translation – to provide “meaningful access” to individuals with limited English proficiency.
  • Disability – Covered entities must take “appropriate steps” to ensure that communications with individuals with disabilities are as effective as communications with others; make all programs provided through electronic and information technology accessible, unless doing so would impose financial or administrative burdens or fundamentally alter the program; and, in most instances, comply with the 2010 Americans with Disabilities Act Standards for Accessible Design when constructing or altering physical facilities.

Now that the final rule has gone into effect, a covered entity has 90 days to post various notices for beneficiaries, enrollees, applicants, and members of the public.  The primary notice requires the covered entity to state its compliance with Section 1557 and the availability of the various accommodations under the rule.  The Director of the Office for Civil Rights of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has made available a sample notice that covers the information required by this notice, but covered entities are advised to work with counsel to ensure they are in compliance with the rule.  In addition, covered entities must post a nondiscrimination statement, and any tagline (i.e., short statement indicating the availability of language assistance services) must be posted in at least the top 15 languages spoken by individuals with limited English proficiency of the relevant state(s) (sample translated resources may be found here).  Again, covered entities are advised to work with counsel to ensure compliance with these notice and posting requirements.

Nathaniel M. Glasser
Nathaniel M. Glasser

North Carolina made waves last week by enacting legislation prohibiting cities from allowing transgender individuals to use public restrooms that match their gender identity and further restricting cities from passing anti-discrimination ordinances that would give protected status to sexual orientation or gender identity.

Employers in North Carolina and across the country, however, should be aware of the trend in the federal courts and agencies to grant protections to transgender workers under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act.  Last week two federal courts allowed transgender plaintiffs to proceed with their gender discrimination claims, representative of the growing acceptance of sex stereotyping or gender nonconformity theories under these circumstances.

In Fabian v. Hospital of Central Connecticut, No. 3:12-cv-01154 (D. Conn. Mar. 18, 2016), the District of Connecticut denied summary judgment to a hospital on a surgeon’s sex bias claims.  The surgeon alleged that the hospital failed to hire her after learning of her plan to transition from male to female.  Tracing the history of transgender claims under Title VII, Judge Underwood, a well-respected jurist in the district, noted that although most early cases considering the issue held that Title VII does not protect transgender individuals, courts more recently have allowed such claims to proceed on a theory that the term “sex” in Title VII refers to discrimination based on factors related to or having something to do with sex.

The District of Arizona reached a similar conclusion in Doe v. Arizona, No. 2:15-cv-02399 (D. Ariz. Mar. 21, 2016).  In that case, a male transgender correctional officer alleged he was not safe at work because his coworkers, who referred to him as “he/she” or “it,” would not respond to his emergency calls.  The court denied Arizona’s motion to dismiss, finding that the plaintiff’s allegation of transgender status satisfied the “protected status” element of a gender discrimination claim under Title VII.  (While not the subject of this post, this case also has important implications regarding failure to exhaust administrative remedies for retaliation claims.)

These courts join a number of federal courts – including the First, Sixth, Ninth, and Eleventh Circuits –that have extended protections to transgender individuals under the sex discrimination provisions of Title VII or Section 1983.  Federal agencies also have expressed their intent to enforce protections for transgender workers.  For instance:

  • The EEOC interprets Title VII as prohibiting discrimination based on gender identity, a position asserted against a Florida-based organization of health care professionals, resulting in a consent decree in 2015, and against a Michigan funeral home in a lawsuit surviving a motion to dismiss.
  • Pursuant to Executive Order 13672, federal contractors are now prohibited from discriminating on the basis of gender identity, and OFCCP has issued amended regulations incorporating this prohibition.
  • OSHA has issued a guide advising that transgender employees should be permitted access to restrooms and locker rooms consistent with their gender identity.
  • Regarding the implementation of Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act, the Department of Health and Human Services has issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, which would incorporate discrimination on the basis of gender identity into the definition of “on the basis of sex.”

Thus, even if North Carolina’s law survives the recent legal challenge in court, employers should be aware that federal law may still grant protections to transgender workers.  Indeed, in January 2015, the Eastern District of North Carolina denied a hospital’s motion to dismiss a claim of sex discrimination brought by a certified nursing assistant alleging she was denied a position based on her transgendered status.

Additionally, regardless of the viability of a claim for transgender discrimination under federal law, at least sixteen states – including California, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey – and the District of Columbia, now include gender identity as a protected characteristic under their discrimination laws.  Employers outside of North Carolina should know whether state or local law provides similar protections.

Employers are advised to take a proactive role in preventing transgender, or gender identity, discrimination in the workplace and to have a plan in place to accommodate the potential needs of transgender workers.